Among the audience were Dr Te Huiragi Waikerepuru and Te Urutahi Waikerepuru who led a Maori welcome. The event was arranged by Intercreate Trustee Tracey Benson

Lee Joachim at SCANZ

Lee Joachim of the Yorta Yorta Nation Aboriginal Corporation Skyped into SCANZ 2015:water and peace to talk with participants. Renita Glencross of Ethos Global, an Aboriginal advocacy organisation also attended SCANZ in the first week. SCANZ 2015 also saw the first involvement of Pacific peoples at SCANZ, with the presence of two participants from Vanuatu – Sandy Sur and Prim Rose Wari; along with the first representation of Inuit peoples with Jesse Tungilik and Stacey Aglok MacDonald of the Nunavut people. Intercreate is seeking further engagement with indigenous groups worldwide.

SCANZ 2015 programme

2015Graphic01-final
This is the final programme for SCANZ 2015 events running from Friday 30th January to Sunday February 1st.

 


 

SCANZ 2015 INTERNATIONAL CELEBRATION OF WATER AND PEACE

Artists and performers from Aotearoa New Zealand, Australia, Canada, America, Vanuatu and Nanavut Territory

Night time projections Pukekura Park 9-11pm Friday 30th January, starting at the Boat Shed Lawn

For further information in the form of short descriptions of the works to be projected, read more here.

 


 

International Day in Puke Ariki Landing and Huatoki Plaza 11am – 4pm Saturday 31st January

 

11-4pm Artworks will be displayed along the Huatoki stream, from the sea end up to Redcoat Lane.

Allan Giddy (NZ/Australia) has an installation where the Huatoki meets the sea. Tracey Benson (Australia) will be at Huatoki Plaza to demonstrate her augmented reality installation Words for Water. USA artists James Werner and Ava Werner have a GPS locative work and an installation respectively in Sir Victor Davies Park. Prim Rose Wari (Vanuatu) has woven work near the Red Coat Lane bridge, along with Vicki Smith from the West Coast of the South Island.

11am – 4pmFluid City, artists from the University of Auckland with activities for all ages, up in Huatoki Plaza.

11am – 4pm – Children’s art about Water and Peace, made at the Quirky Creative workshops during the week.

11am – 12.30 – find out all about water for kids of all ages with Kevin Archer, TRC Education Officer and Chris Fowles. The session includes looking at water samples for the tiny creatures living there and finding out how healthy the water samples are. Chris and Kevin will be there in thigh waders and take samples from the Huatoki Stream. They will be on Puke Ariki landing.

1.00pm – Dance performances in the lower area of Huatoki Plaza.

2pm – Launch of the Vanuatu Women’s Water Music DVD beginning in Huatoki Plaza and moving to at Puke Ariki landing.

2.30pm – Riverside cinema – video by artists on water and peace under the road at Puke Ariki landing.

7.00pm – 11pm Riverside cinema – video by artists on water and peace under the road at Puke Ariki landing.

 


 

Walking hui-symposium on water and peace 11am – 4pm Sunday 1st February, meet at Huatoki Plaza

Take part in discussions about water and peace, and hear artists talk about their work.

RAIN VENUE: ART / F BLOCK, WITT (20 Bell Street, New Plymouth)

11-4pm Artworks along the Huatoki stream (see above for details). If it rains, the Walking Symposium will be held up at the WITT campus – meeting at F Block.

7.00pm – 11pm Riverside cinema – video by artists on water and peace under the road at Puke Ariki landing.

Come along and join any event for as long as you like, there is no need to book

Sponsored by Intercreate.org, Creative New Zealand, Te Matahiapo, TSB Community Trust, Western Institute of Technology at Taranaki and the Intercreate.org community

 


 

Quirky Creative – SCANZ 2015 Water and Peace Programme

The following programme is for ages 5+ to adult – bring the family!

Mon 26 Jan 1-4pm
Vessels: Mosaic baths for birds or bees, or mosaic glass water bottles

Tue 27 Jan 10am-1pm
Psychedelic Hippy Day: Tie-dye shirts with a peace message

Wed 28 Jan 1-4pm
Raindrop Art: Glistening drops to display later at Huatoki Plaza

Fri 30 Jan 10am-1pm
Art Abandonment
: Tiny projects made to be abandoned and found

Sat 31 Jan 11am-4pm

Visit the Quirky Kids space at the Huatoki Plaza

Programmes held at Creative Focus, Block C, WITT

Booking is essential due to limited spaces. For more info contact Quirky Creative.

vanauatu01-519

Vanuatu Women’s Water Music

vanauatu01-519

A special feature of SCANZ2015:water*peace is the Aotearoa New Zealand launch of the Vanuatu Women’s Water Music DVD. The Water Music dance involves the performers standing waste deep in the water, and slapping the surface as part of the dance. This is performed by the Leweton Cultural Experience. They are based on the remote northern islands of Gaua and Merelava in Vanuatu, and live in a village in Espiritu Santo where they present, share and maintain their unique cultural traditions and practises across cultures and generations.

Intercreate.org, Te Matahiapo Indigenous Research Organisation, Creative New Zealand, TSB Community Trust and the Western Institute of Technology at Taranaki are honoured to host two members of the Leweton Cultural Experience, Sandy Sur and Prim Rose Wari who will attend SCANZ2015:water*peace, and take part in the International Celebrations of Water and Peace from Friday January 30th to February 1st in central Nga Motu New Plymouth, based around the Huatoki stream walkway and plazas. The SCANZ residency begins on the 17th of January with many projects presented on the celebration weekend.

Following is an account of the development of the water dance.

The History of the Magical Water Music

My name is Warren Wevat Wessergo. I come from a village called Dolap in West Gaua.

All of the women from the Banks Islands, in the north of Vanuatu, can make music by splashing the water. This is very common. But this is just a standard sound all over the islands. However, in 1974, my aunt, Elizabeth Womal Marego, with her daughters, and my mother, Zalet (Charlotte) Hilda, with my sisters, they all came together to discuss the development of the ‘sound of splashing water’ into something more like ‘water music’.

The reason that these women decided to explore the idea of developing the ‘water music’ was that they had noticed the people on yachts displayed an increasing interest in the practice. Indeed, one of these yachtspeople had given a “Visitors Register” book to a Catechist on the island by the name of Patteson Worere. Patteson kept the book in the church and all the visiting yachts to Dulap were asked to nominate someone to enter the name of the yacht and their signature into the Visitors Register.

After all the discussions, Elizabeth, Zalet and their daughters chose Rovan Womal Marego to be the first leader of the Water Music group. Rovan worked with the women to codify and name the various sounds, beats, rhythms and chords of the water music. This is important because no one had ever given a name to the sounds of the splashing water before. Before they could create new sounds, they need to name the existing sound. So Elizabeth and Zalet decided that the first task for Rovan was to lead the group through the process of naming the existing sound from splashing water – the sound that was practiced all over the Banks Islands. They named this vus tuwal.

Then they named the four other ‘beats’ that they had just created:
kor nē-bē – the sound of rainwater falling over stones
ne kia – the sound of dolphins flapping their fins on the water
nē-rē – the sound of rainwater falling on leaves and thatched roof
vus ero – the sound of people chasing and shepherding fish into traps and nets

Elizabeth and Zalet and their daughters spent the rest of the year practicing the newly created beats and rhythms close to my house in the water at Lembrig Spring. Then in 1975, some more yachts visited West Gaua asking to hear the Water Music. My sister Martha Rowon was practising the new Water Music at the seashore. Some yachts in the area could hear the sounds that she was making. Intruiged by the strange tonal qualities of the music, the yachts searched for the source of the sounds. Eventually they found Martha on the reef and some of them were so impressed with the music that they presented Martha with gifts of clothes, shoes, and jewelry. This was the first instance of someone attracting visitors especially to see and hear the Water Music.

In August 1975, another yacht visited the area. These visitors also brought with them a camera. Many of the villagers were excited by the camera and the opportunity to have their photo taken. In all the excitement, a small boy was washed off the reef by a large wave while his parents were distracted by the camera. Eventually his drowned body was found and brought ashore. The local pastor at the time was a cousin of Martha. His name was Father Marcel Wewot. Father Marcel prayed for the boy to bring him back to life. Miraculouly, he was successful so he baptized him Wewot Lembrig. So now, every year during yachting season, the daughters of Elizabeth and Zalet, and the daughters of their daughters, they go down to the reef at Lambrig Spring and entertain the visitors with the magical water music. At the end of their show, the owners of the yachts hand over bags of second hand clothes, shoes, and other gifts and everyone remembers the miracle of Wewot Lembrig.

Time went by without much significant change. [There was plenty of migration of people from Gaua and neighbouring Merelava to (and from) Luganville, on the island of Espiritu Santo.] Tourists would come on yachts during the dry season and the women would perform the water music in exchange for some gifts. Then in the year 2000, Mr Sandy Sur brought some tourists to Dulap on a cruising yacht. But this time, the tourists were so impressed that when Sandy suggested that the tourists pay the women with cash, the tourists were happy to oblige. And so this occasion marked the transition from an amateur folkloric performance into a professional, revenue-raising, tourist attraction. The word passed around amongst the other yachties and tourists that there was a magical water music performance to be seen in Dulap and so many other tour companies and independent yachties started to come to Gaua. And so this occasion marked the transition from an amateur folkloric performance into a professional, revenue-raising, tourist attraction. We had begun the process of commercialising the water music.

A few years later in 2003, the Provincial government of TORBA held an Arts Festival in the village of Aver at North Gaua. The women from Dulap made their way to Aver for the Arts Festival and for the first time, performed the new water music for the Vanuatu public (as opposed to tourists). The people of North Gaua and the other visitors were amazed at this new water music. There were two English volunteers teaching at Losalava school at the time and they helped the news of the new water music performance reach the community in Port Vila. [This was the first time that Tom Dick from Further Arts had heard of the water music, but his ethnomusicologist friend Monika Stern, had recorded the water music in Merelava some years before. Tom and Monika presented the idea of the water music to] the Head of the Delegation of the European Union, Nicolas Berlanga Martinez. Nicolas was also very impressed with the water music and he arranged for some of the family members to travel to Zaragoza in Spain for the World Expo of 2004.

Then Sandy Sur organized a meeting of the Mwerlap-speaking diaspora of people from Gaua and Merelava who were living on a block of land in the Sograon (Showground) area just on the fringes of Luganville – the “northern town” as it is known by residents of the capital, Port Vila, in the south – or “Canal” as it is known by locals of the island of Espiritu Santo. [By this time, many of the original innovators of the water music from 1974 were living in Luganville.] Through this meeting Sandy galvanized the family around the performance of “water music”. Sandy knew the potential of the cultural practice of the water music as a tourist spectacle.

During the course of the meeting several different activities were suggested as being able to be presented as a package to tourists. These activities included traditional dance (terrestrial) of men and women respectively – and a communal dance featuring the whole community. Warren was adamant that the water music had to be a feature of the package of activities that were presented to the tourists. It was important that this will of Warren be clear to all as it is Warren’s mother and Aunt and sister who were the original innovators of the water music in 1974 in the nasara of Wevat Wessergro, Saint Bartholomew, West Gaua. To this end, the meeting continued long into the night, and also moved down to the shore where the men and women could stand in the water and visualize the water music, and test and demonstrate the possibility of its transmission. In the end, Hilda Rosal Wavales Warren, Warren’s wife, was appointed to the role of Maestra (Creator, Composer and Teacher) of Water Music for the Leweton community.

Hilda woked very hard to develop the water music and to engage all the women and girls in the community. It is largely due to her hard work that we can say that the Leweton Cultural Group has become so popular and that the Vanuatu Women’s Water Music is known around the world. Hilda created eight more water music chords which are totally different to the original sounds and the other five beats listed above, and each of the eight new ones have their own names and meanings. These names and meanings were developed through a collaborative process involving the full community going to the ocean’s edge to listen to the women performing the sounds and the community would listen to the music and share their thoughts and feelngs as to the meaning and names of the sounds. Chief Colin, Kuber, Judah, Sandy Sur, and other chiefs and community leaders were there. All the participants had a pen and paper and they wrote down their ideas for the names and meanings of the songs: sometimes the meaning of the song was attributed to the ocean, other times to the sky or the land. All of the names and meanings were assigned in the Mwerlap language which is the language of Merelava and East Gaua, and each of them are a product of Leweton.

This information has been presented by Warren Wevat Wessergo from West Gaua. This is his story. Additional information has been compiled by Sandy Sur and Thomas Dick. Translated from bislama by Thomas Dick.

vanauatu01-519

Vanuatu Women’s Water Music

vanauatu01-519

A special feature of SCANZ2015:water*peace is the Aotearoa New Zealand launch of the Vanuatu Women’s Water Music DVD. The Water Music dance involves the performers standing waste deep in the water, and slapping the surface as part of the dance. This is performed by the Leweton Cultural Experience. They are based on the remote northern islands of Gaua and Merelava in Vanuatu, and live in a village in Espiritu Santo where they present, share and maintain their unique cultural traditions and practises across cultures and generations.

Wantok Musik and Intercreate.org in association with Te Matahiapo Indigenous Research Organisation, Creative New Zealand, TSB Community Trust, the Western Institute of Technology at Taranaki and the Intercreate.org community are honoured to host two members of the Leweton Cultural Experience, Sandy Sur and Prim Rose Wari who will attend SCANZ2015:water*peace, and take part in the International Celebrations of Water and Peace from Friday January 30th to February 1st in central Nga Motu New Plymouth, based around the Huatoki stream walkway and plazas. The SCANZ residency begins on the 17th of January with many projects presented on the celebration weekend.

Following is an account of the development of the water dance.

The History of the Magical Water Music

My name is Warren Wevat Wessergo. I come from a village called Dolap in West Gaua.

All of the women from the Banks Islands, in the north of Vanuatu, can make music by splashing the water. This is very common. But this is just a standard sound all over the islands. However, in 1974, my aunt, Elizabeth Womal Marego, with her daughters, and my mother, Zalet (Charlotte) Hilda, with my sisters, they all came together to discuss the development of the ‘sound of splashing water’ into something more like ‘water music’.

The reason that these women decided to explore the idea of developing the ‘water music’ was that they had noticed the people on yachts displayed an increasing interest in the practice. Indeed, one of these yachtspeople had given a “Visitors Register” book to a Catechist on the island by the name of Patteson Worere. Patteson kept the book in the church and all the visiting yachts to Dulap were asked to nominate someone to enter the name of the yacht and their signature into the Visitors Register.

After all the discussions, Elizabeth, Zalet and their daughters chose Rovan Womal Marego to be the first leader of the Water Music group. Rovan worked with the women to codify and name the various sounds, beats, rhythms and chords of the water music. This is important because no one had ever given a name to the sounds of the splashing water before. Before they could create new sounds, they need to name the existing sound. So Elizabeth and Zalet decided that the first task for Rovan was to lead the group through the process of naming the existing sound from splashing water – the sound that was practiced all over the Banks Islands. They named this vus tuwal.

Then they named the four other ‘beats’ that they had just created:
kor nē-bē – the sound of rainwater falling over stones
ne kia – the sound of dolphins flapping their fins on the water
nē-rē – the sound of rainwater falling on leaves and thatched roof
vus ero – the sound of people chasing and shepherding fish into traps and nets

Elizabeth and Zalet and their daughters spent the rest of the year practicing the newly created beats and rhythms close to my house in the water at Lembrig Spring. Then in 1975, some more yachts visited West Gaua asking to hear the Water Music. My sister Martha Rowon was practising the new Water Music at the seashore. Some yachts in the area could hear the sounds that she was making. Intruiged by the strange tonal qualities of the music, the yachts searched for the source of the sounds. Eventually they found Martha on the reef and some of them were so impressed with the music that they presented Martha with gifts of clothes, shoes, and jewelry. This was the first instance of someone attracting visitors especially to see and hear the Water Music.

In August 1975, another yacht visited the area. These visitors also brought with them a camera. Many of the villagers were excited by the camera and the opportunity to have their photo taken. In all the excitement, a small boy was washed off the reef by a large wave while his parents were distracted by the camera. Eventually his drowned body was found and brought ashore. The local pastor at the time was a cousin of Martha. His name was Father Marcel Wewot. Father Marcel prayed for the boy to bring him back to life. Miraculouly, he was successful so he baptized him Wewot Lembrig. So now, every year during yachting season, the daughters of Elizabeth and Zalet, and the daughters of their daughters, they go down to the reef at Lambrig Spring and entertain the visitors with the magical water music. At the end of their show, the owners of the yachts hand over bags of second hand clothes, shoes, and other gifts and everyone remembers the miracle of Wewot Lembrig.

Time went by without much significant change. [There was plenty of migration of people from Gaua and neighbouring Merelava to (and from) Luganville, on the island of Espiritu Santo.] Tourists would come on yachts during the dry season and the women would perform the water music in exchange for some gifts. Then in the year 2000, Mr Sandy Sur brought some tourists to Dulap on a cruising yacht. But this time, the tourists were so impressed that when Sandy suggested that the tourists pay the women with cash, the tourists were happy to oblige. And so this occasion marked the transition from an amateur folkloric performance into a professional, revenue-raising, tourist attraction. The word passed around amongst the other yachties and tourists that there was a magical water music performance to be seen in Dulap and so many other tour companies and independent yachties started to come to Gaua. And so this occasion marked the transition from an amateur folkloric performance into a professional, revenue-raising, tourist attraction. We had begun the process of commercialising the water music.

A few years later in 2003, the Provincial government of TORBA held an Arts Festival in the village of Aver at North Gaua. The women from Dulap made their way to Aver for the Arts Festival and for the first time, performed the new water music for the Vanuatu public (as opposed to tourists). The people of North Gaua and the other visitors were amazed at this new water music. There were two English volunteers teaching at Losalava school at the time and they helped the news of the new water music performance reach the community in Port Vila. This was the first time that Tom Dick from Further Arts had heard of the water music, but his ethnomusicologist friend Monika Stern, had recorded the water music in Merelava some years before. Tom and Monika presented the idea of the water music to the Head of the Delegation of the European Union, Nicolas Berlanga Martinez. Nicolas was also very impressed with the water music and he arranged for some of the family members to travel to Zaragoza in Spain for the World Expo of 2004.

Then Sandy Sur organized a meeting of the Mwerlap-speaking diaspora of people from Gaua and Merelava who were living on a block of land in the Sograon (Showground) area just on the fringes of Luganville – the “northern town” as it is known by residents of the capital, Port Vila, in the south – or “Canal” as it is known by locals of the island of Espiritu Santo. By this time, many of the original innovators of the water music from 1974 were living in Luganville. Through this meeting Sandy galvanized the family around the performance of “water music”. Sandy knew the potential of the cultural practice of the water music as a tourist spectacle.

During the course of the meeting several different activities were suggested as being able to be presented as a package to tourists. These activities included traditional dance (terrestrial) of men and women respectively – and a communal dance featuring the whole community. Warren was adamant that the water music had to be a feature of the package of activities that were presented to the tourists. It was important that this will of Warren be clear to all as it is Warren’s mother and Aunt and sister who were the original innovators of the water music in 1974 in the nasara of Wevat Wessergro, Saint Bartholomew, West Gaua. To this end, the meeting continued long into the night, and also moved down to the shore where the men and women could stand in the water and visualize the water music, and test and demonstrate the possibility of its transmission. In the end, Hilda Rosal Wavales Warren, Warren’s wife, was appointed to the role of Maestra (Creator, Composer and Teacher) of Water Music for the Leweton community.

Hilda worked very hard to develop the water music and to engage all the women and girls in the community. It is largely due to her hard work that we can say that the Leweton Cultural Group has become so popular and that the Vanuatu Women’s Water Music is known around the world. Hilda created eight more water music chords which are totally different to the original sounds and the other five beats listed above, and each of the eight new ones have their own names and meanings. These names and meanings were developed through a collaborative process involving the full community going to the ocean’s edge to listen to the women performing the sounds and the community would listen to the music and share their thoughts and feelings as to the meaning and names of the sounds. Chief Colin, Kuber, Judah, Sandy Sur, and other chiefs and community leaders were there. All the participants had a pen and paper and they wrote down their ideas for the names and meanings of the songs: sometimes the meaning of the song was attributed to the ocean, other times to the sky or the land. All of the names and meanings were assigned in the Mwerlap language which is the language of Merelava and East Gaua, and each of them are a product of Leweton.

This information has been presented by Warren Wevat Wessergo from West Gaua. This is his story. Additional information has been compiled by Sandy Sur and Thomas Dick. Translated from bislama by Thomas Dick.

SCANZ 2015 water and peace map

Clicking on the photograph below will take you to a map and folder of images of the Huatoki stream walkway from the sea to Redcoat Lane. This is the path of the locations of SCANZ2015 water*peace artworks, presentations and installations.

The map shows the locations for art works, performances and activities that occur on the final weekend of SCANZ2015 – Saturday 31st of January in Huatoki Plaza (11am – 4pm), and Sunday 1st of February (11am – 4pm) along the Huatoki from the sea to Redcoat Lane. There are also night time projections in Pukekura Park on Friday 30th of January, 9pm to 11pm.

SCANZ2015 sites

Below are the photographs in a slideshow.

Fluid City

Fluid City by Charlotte Šunde and Alys Longley

Fluid City

Fluid City is a SCANZ 2015 project, shown here is the version at James Cook High School, Manurewa, 16 October 2014. Photo by James Hutchinson.

For the SCANZ 2015 residency, we propose to redevelop the Fluid City content in relation to the local environment and cultures of the Taranaki region. This will be developed in the form of a short water film (for the roving cinema); interviews and stories from locals including tangata whenua from Parihaka marae, farmers, school children, artists, musicians, poets and other residents; and fragments of creative writing or environmental sound (for the roving vessel of stories); and fresh water samples collected from streams and other significant waterways around the Taranaki district (for the roving laboratory). We intend to gather this material in concert with and informed by the local hosts of the SCANZ residency.

In addition, a new site-specific choreographic performance (to be performed in and around the Fluid City site) will be created to accompany the water vessels. We will work with our hosts to attract locals to participate in the dance performance work, guided by a dance teacher from the Fluid City collective. Fluid City creates a space where the general public can engage informatively with ideas and issues around water sustainability, and can also contribute their knowledge and questions through, for example, writing postcards for display or telling stories which are then recorded and added to an interactive audio installation.

Fluid City is an installation for diverse communities of all ages that brings alive issues of water sustainability through a roaming science lab, cinema and vessel of stories. The project is a mobile and transportable art-science collaboration that brings researchers into contact with members of the public in ways that are informative, interactive and inventive. This work invites visitors into embodied engagements, to discover through kinaesthetic, tactile, auditory, visual and interrelational modes. It takes the form of three cupboard-like vessels (that we refer to as ‘roving reservoirs’) towed by bicycles. Each of the three vessels has a unique emphasis.

One is a mini-cinema that invites the passers-by to come in close and peer through a diving mask into the vessel to view a film about water. The film is a three-minute animation featuring water in a variety of abstract and functional forms (the reservoir, mountain stream, flowing across the road, entering a stormwater drain, spilling into its sink/the harbour or ocean), including mundane, everyday uses (irrigating the garden, boiling peas, taking a shower). Few words are employed. The moving image has proven captivating to all ages.

A second vessel is a scientific mini-laboratory that enables participants to test water samples collected from local waterways. The reconstructed mobile laboratory houses a powerful microscope and a range of test tubes on display. Participants don white lab coats and select a test tube sample, identifying its source from an accompanying map of the collection sites in their local catchment. The audience will be guided by a qualified microbiologist who can explain what is typically invisible to the naked eye: the microbial worlds of their waterways as active, colourful, alive – explaining differences in water quality that distinguish a forested stream from a polluted waterway.

The third vessel provides a space for people to sit (on upturned buckets with cushions) and listen through headphones to different voices sharing a variety of stories, poems, songs and scientific explanations about water in its myriad forms. The audience is also invited to share their personal memories and concerns about water through writing or drawing on postcards (which we will design) and to then contribute this writing to a kind of washing line set up along the river-side space. This will create a tapestry of stories, issues, thoughts and pictures of water reflecting a multiplicity of meanings and ideas.

SCANZ2015 confirmed dates

Dates for SCANZ2015:water*peace have been confirmed, with participants arriving on the 17th of January 2015 and departing on February 2nd 2015.

The first night will be spent in Nga Motu New Plymouth so that participants can travel by van and car to Parihaka, leaving around 8am on Saturday the 18th. As a special feature of SCANZ 2015, we will be staying overnight. We return to the WITT campus on Sunday afternoon, for a first meet up at the WITT campus.

The final weekend of SCANZ occurs on the 31st of January and the 1st of February 2015 with participants departing on Monday the 2nd of February.

Parihaka

“Parihaka, depicted in this painting by George Clarendon Beale (1856–1939), was New Zealand’s largest Maori community by 1881. Its prophets attracted followers from around the country.” Source:http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/parihaka-painting, (Ministry for Culture and Heritage). CC-BY-NC

SCANZ 2015:water*peace to begin at Parihaka

water*peace is set to commence at the settlement of Parihaka, on the 18th of January 2015. The 18th and 19th of each month are set aside by the Taranaki community, to celebrate their prophets of peace, Te Whiti o Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi.

SCANZ participants will join the community of Parihaka in this celebration. It will be noho marae, meaning the stay will be overnight. Kaumatua (elder) of Parihaka Ruakere Hond, has asked that the participants collectively present their thoughts and feelings on peace to the community on the Saturday night, a great honour.

Previously at SCANZ 2013, participants visited on both days. The noho marae presents a deepening of association. Some of the Aotearoa participants have iwi (tribe), hapu (sub-tribe) or whanau (family) links and are hoping to work with members of the community on projects.

The Parihaka story

It is the 5th of November 1881. “The Europeans are expecting a bloody battle. In the build-up to the invasion, some of the men have been sitting around the campfires boasting about who is going to shoot the first Maori.

On the other side, the 2000 people of Parihaka have been expecting the troops. In preparation, the women have baked 500 loaves of bread to share with their visitors.”

The events at Parihaka that fateful year, are a significant part of the history of Aotearoa New Zealand. The response of Maori under the guidance and leadership of Te Whiti o Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi has been inspirational to peace movements led by people such as Mahatma Ghandi and Martin Luther King Jr. The episode is also defining for local iwi (tribes), and is significant to many New Zealanders.

The words quoted above are from a piece of insightful writing by Virginia Winder from her article for Puke Ariki’s website. Thanks to Jo Tito for forwarding the link to Virginia’s article.

Links

The Parihaka story
Parihaka painting from the Ministry of Culture and Heritage site
Te Whiti and Tohu on Te Ara, the encyclopedia of New Zealand pages on Maori prophets
Waitangi Tribunal report (includes Maori perspective of events)

 

Artists at Parihaka

SCANZ 2013:3rd nature residency artists and Parihaka hosts outside Te Raanui, a whare kai (house for eating). The visit to Parihaka set the 2013 residency off to an excellent beginning. In 2015, we will stay overnight.

scanz2015:water*peace-call

Call for projects

2015Graphic05web

Water*peace

Water is essential to survival, revered and respected worldwide for its power, curative and creative abilities. Water as a resource has become intensely politicised and monetised, in contrast to the view that access to fresh water is a fundamental human right. Peace is also essential to the sustainability of humans on Earth. Join us to discuss and put forward positive, connecting views on water and peace that engages our community. This is the first call for projects and residency with submissions due November 8, 2013 (this allows for planning and fundraising). Read more…

Noho marae

SCANZ2015: water*peace will be the fifth SCANZ residency and starts in January 2015. It will commence with noho marae (overnight stay) at Parihaka, world renowned as a site of peaceful protest. The stay coincides with the 18th and 19th, when Te Whiti and Tohu, leaders of the peace movement are celebrated.

Open residency

This will be followed by a two week open, creative and interdisciplinary residency. It is our hope that tangata whenua, indigenous peoples, New Zealanders and other global citizens will be able to take part.

We are suggesting that artists, environmentalists, technologists, scientists, writers, performers, dancers and people interested in the positive aspects of water and peace, all take part. Anyone can submit a project in one or more of the categories listed further down this page.

Temporary works in public space

We would like to have five to seven temporary works in public space, shown for one day or overnight on the final weekend of the residency. These will be sited along a river walkway. No power will be provided at the sites, so solar, wind, and water powered projects are suitable (battery and static install are two further options).

Day of public activities about water, water quality and peace

We are seeking proposals for a day of activities that engage our local community in issues around water and peace.

Night time building projections

We are seeking projection works about water or peace, to be projected on to the side of a local building in the evening.

Online exhibition

Links to water and peace resources online will be collated. Included will be a curated selection of online projects about water and/or peace.

SCANZ hui

On the final weekend of the residency there will be a SCANZ hui. Day one is at WITT, the local polytechnic and allows for presentations that require technology, the internet, projectors etc. Day two is a walking symposium to view the artworks and have thematic discussions in the environment of the river walkways.

A separate call for hui/symposium presentations will be made at a later date, through the same application page on Easy Chair.

Categories of projects

Water and/or Peace residency and temporary public work (residency with public exhibition project)
Water and/or Peace residency (residency without an exhibited project)
Water and/or Peace temporary public work (no residency, public exhibition project)
Public activity day project
Night time projection on building
Online exhibition
Pure research

Process

Applicants should download the pdf application form by clicking the link below. This should be filled out and attached to the application made at EasyChair.

IMPORTANT: Fill out the SCANZ application pdf first, then go to Easy Chair and make yourself a log in. After entering your contact information, project title and submission abstract (max  500 words, target 350) with keywords, tick the appropriate category and topic. Upload the completed SCANZ pdf form in the field that says ‘Paper’. In the field that says ‘Attachment’ upload a  .pdf, .doc, .docx or .txt which contains a a one page CV and a project image.

A two stage process will be used. Successful applicants will then be able to apply for accommodation and/or food subsidies from Intercreate. It will also be possible to apply for micro budgets for the public event one day of activities and river walkway art works.

This first call for applications is due on November 8, 2013. While this is early, it will allow successful applicants to commence planning and fundraising. A second call will be made at a later date.

 

Useful links

Background to the project and issues of water and peace.

This short video is made by the people of Parihaka about Parihaka.

Pdf SCANZ2015 Application Form. Right click and download the form, open it in Acrobat and fill it out (Mac users, you cannot use Preview, it has to be Acrobat). Then attach the SCANZ form to your EasyChair submission.

EasyChair submission page.

mediaArtProjects04

media art projects

Intercreate is commissioning two innovative art works, to be realised in 2014. The Media Art Projects aim to inspire artists and creative teams to think boldly about combinations of cultural ideas and contemporary media technologies, that could be implemented in public space and/or Pukekura Park. These projects are open to Aotearoa New Zealand artists here and abroad.