SCANZ2013:cyanobacteria

cyanobacteria

Live cyanobacteria cultured by artist-scientist Hideo Iwasaki is placed into specimen jars in preparation for exhibition

The image above shows preparation work for the 3rd nature exhibition in Puke Ariki. The cyanobacteria was cultured by artist-scientist Professor Hideo Iwasaki of Waseda University, Japan. Professor Iwasaki grows the cyanobacteria in a form derivative of humans, with a head, body, arms and legs.

The cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria, and are ancestors to chloroplasts in plants. A chloroplast captures energy from the sun, and it is said that cyanobacteria helped to make Earth suitable for life. While on exhibition at Puke Ariki the cyanobacteria will be growing slowly, over a period of two months. Instead of the sun, the bacteria will photosynthesise with the light from an animation projected on to them from below.

The work of art and science raises several questions about the boundaries of life and our relationship to living plants. As Professor Iwasaki says: “They will be living at an interface which is hard to be called artificial or natural, drawing complicated patterns, and die.”

SCANZ2013: Geolocating

Nga Motu Marine Reserve society

Today’s workshop was held in the venue to be used at WITT for the wananga-symposium. Our guest were Mike Ure, Elise Smith and Anne Scott of the Nga Motu Marine Reserve Society. Mike is also part of the Ahu Ahu beach group.

Mike Ure

Mike Ure talked about Maori understanding of the local coastal area

Elise Smith spoke about the little blue penguin project. The society has been gathering data on the penguins, and placing it online using maps. The aim is for Maori knowledge and creative projects to be added to the same online map.

Elise Smith spoke about the little blue penguin project. The society has been gathering data on the penguins, and placing it online using maps. The aim is for Maori knowledge and creative projects to be added to the same online map.

Anne Scott

Anne Scott from the Marine Society discussing the aims of society projects. Thanks to Martin Drury for the images.

SCANZ 2013: harakeke-flax-raranga-weaving

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Photograph by Terri Ripeka Crawford

 

Today the residency theme was harakeke/raranga (flax/weaving). Jo Tito led the day with a local weaver. First up was harakeke gathering then some making. The image above was taken using a lens provided by Deborah Lawler-Dormer.

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Photo by Tracey Benson

Jo tito and Mako Jones, who led the day, gathering the harakeke. Part of the day involved hearing what harakeke means to Maori.

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Photo by Tracey Benson

 

Nigel Helyer and Darko Fritz at Puniho with woven works.