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SCANZ2015:water*peace

Glen Skipper at Te Rewa Rewa pa

Artists, tangata whenua and locals in the environment of Taranaki, with the Waiwhakaiho River and Taranaki Maunga (mountain) in the background. This photo is from the recent Intercreate event “Ko Tatou te Tangata.”

What

Water is essential to survival, revered and respected worldwide for its power, creative and curative abilities.

Wai, water or flow is central to the worldviews of many indigenous cultures of Earth, and is of special significance to tangata whenua (the people of the land) of Aotearoa New Zealand.

The scientific study of water and the onset of turbulence was central to the development of Chaos Theory.

Today water monitoring in the environment has become important to sustainable approaches to water management.

Water as a resource has become intensely politicised and monetised, in contrast to the view that access to fresh water is a fundamental human right.

Peace is also essential to the sustainability of humans on Earth.

SCANZ2015:water*peace brings together people from diverse backgrounds,connecting everyone in a positive expression of our relationship with water and the power of peace.

 

Where

Water*peace begins on the with noho marae (overnight stay) at Parihaka in Taranaki, Aotearoa New Zealand. The 18th and 19th of each month are special days of the celebration of Te Whiti and Tohu, prophets of peace in colonial times. They were leaders during an infamous episode of New Zealand’s history, and Parihaka is today world renowned for the stance on peaceful protest in the face armed constabulary.

On the afternoon of the 19th, SCANZ participants will return to Nga Motu New Plymouth where they will stay and work on the campus of the Western Institute of Technology at Taranaki. Over a two week period they will collaborate, work with visit and be visited by locals, conduct workshops and create works and projects to be exhibited on the banks of the Huatoki River walkway.

There will be a public activity day,  viewing of the installations and night time projections in Huatoki Plaza. A walking symposium on the final day will follow the path of the works along the Huatoki up to Pukekura Park.

 

When

Saturday January 17th – participants arrive in Nga Motu New Plymouth. There is a welcoming on to the WITT campus.

Sunday January 18th – travel to Parihaka (depart 8am). Overnight stay at Parihaka. Group discussion in the evening with residents of Parihaka.

Monday January 19th – mid to late afternoon return to New Plymouth.

Tuesday January 20th – morning – first presentation by invited guests (likely to be a tangata whenua group).

Wednesday January 21st – morning – second presentation ( local electronics specialist Andrew Hornblow).

Thursday January 22nd – morning – third local presentation (environmental group).

Friday January 23rd – morning – fourth local presentation (likely to be a raranga/weaving session, may involve travel).

Saturday January 24th – day is open to explore Taranaki, do project work, take part in spontaneous collaboration or take a beach, coastal or mountain walk.

Sunday January 25th – day is open to explore Taranaki, do project work, take part in spontaneous collaboration or take a beach, coastal or mountain walk.

Monday January 26th to Friday January 30th – working on projects / collaboration / testing / installation / preparation for weekend presentation.

Saturday January 31st – Day of installation of projects along Huatoki walkway and or Pukekura Park. This is also the public activity day in Huatoki Plaza.  All applicable projects presented in the Plaza. Night time projections either in Huatoki Plaza or Pukekura Park.

Sunday February 1st – commence hui / walking symposium at 9am along the Huatoki walkway. Poroporoaki / reflections on the residency in the late afternoon.

Monday February 2nd – participants depart accommodation for outward bound travel.

Please note the above schedule may change and is subject to confirmation by appropriate organisations and individuals.

 

Future of electronic arts survey

Intercreate survey graphic

Intercreate.org survey: the future of electronic and digital arts

 

The survey has now closed, thank you for your participation and interest.

Please direct any comments or questions to ian dot clothier at intercreate dot org.

Ko Tatou te Tangata: talk

Glen Skipper at Te Rewa Rewa pa

Glen Skipper (wearing leather hat) talks about the history, spirit and energies of Te Rewa Rewa pa.

As part of Intercreate’s Media Art Project Ko Tatou te Tangata a series of meetings and discussions with local iwi Ngati Tawhirikura were held, co-ordinated by Kura Puke and Stu Foster. One of the consequences of these discussion was that local historian and Puke Ariki Poutiaki Taonga Glen Skipper gave a talk about Te Rewa Rewa pa, at the pa site. One aim of the Media Art Project is to direct a laser from Katere Ki Te Moana marae to Te Rewa Rewa pa. The laser will carry audio contributed by local tangata whenua (people of the land, as Maori refer to themselves). The pa, now uninhabited, is a large site on the New Plymouth foreshore.

The two sites are connected by whakapapa (genealogy) people and history. Where once there was large settlement at Te Rewa Rewa, now the closest marae is Katere, which is several kilometres away. To direct laser light across the whenua (land), through the night sky carrying traditional knowledge and awareness is to re-awaken connection to place, and the project has facilitated this process greatly.

When standing on Te Rewa Rewa, the look and feel is that of farmed land, with a large open flat space at a good height for local visibility and indeed the land is leased to a farmer presently. Pieces of history are everywhere, with small entrances to mid 20th century structures, and pits in the flat plateau. The story of this land, its people, events, the politics, intrigue, comings and goings rise from hidden earth as Skipper takes us further into this place and it’s surrounds. Here, buried from everyday consciousness and awakened by the project are the many energies that constitute the living past, the veil having been lifted in the most delicate way by the efforts of Puke and Foster.

Parihaka

“Parihaka, depicted in this painting by George Clarendon Beale (1856–1939), was New Zealand’s largest Maori community by 1881. Its prophets attracted followers from around the country.” Source:http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/parihaka-painting, (Ministry for Culture and Heritage). CC-BY-NC

SCANZ 2015:water*peace to begin at Parihaka

water*peace is set to commence at the settlement of Parihaka, on the 18th of January 2015. The 18th and 19th of each month are set aside by the Taranaki community, to celebrate their prophets of peace, Te Whiti o Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi.

SCANZ participants will join the community of Parihaka in this celebration. It will be noho marae, meaning the stay will be overnight. Kaumatua (elder) of Parihaka Ruakere Hond, has asked that the participants collectively present their thoughts and feelings on peace to the community on the Saturday night, a great honour.

Previously at SCANZ 2013, participants visited on both days. The noho marae presents a deepening of association. Some of the Aotearoa participants have iwi (tribe), hapu (sub-tribe) or whanau (family) links and are hoping to work with members of the community on projects.

The Parihaka story

It is the 5th of November 1881. “The Europeans are expecting a bloody battle. In the build-up to the invasion, some of the men have been sitting around the campfires boasting about who is going to shoot the first Maori.

On the other side, the 2000 people of Parihaka have been expecting the troops. In preparation, the women have baked 500 loaves of bread to share with their visitors.”

The events at Parihaka that fateful year, are a significant part of the history of Aotearoa New Zealand. The response of Maori under the guidance and leadership of Te Whiti o Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi has been inspirational to peace movements led by people such as Mahatma Ghandi and Martin Luther King Jr. The episode is also defining for local iwi (tribes), and is significant to many New Zealanders.

The words quoted above are from a piece of insightful writing by Virginia Winder from her article for Puke Ariki’s website. Thanks to Jo Tito for forwarding the link to Virginia’s article.

Links

The Parihaka story
Parihaka painting from the Ministry of Culture and Heritage site
Te Whiti and Tohu on Te Ara, the encyclopedia of New Zealand pages on Maori prophets
Waitangi Tribunal report (includes Maori perspective of events)

 

Artists at Parihaka

SCANZ 2013:3rd nature residency artists and Parihaka hosts outside Te Raanui, a whare kai (house for eating). The visit to Parihaka set the 2013 residency off to an excellent beginning. In 2015, we will stay overnight.

huatoki-walkway2

Journey of a river/stream walkway: the Huatoki

The Huatoki runs under the main street of New Plymouth, then emerges in a mix of rustic walkway with hybrid plants and trees.

This small park is the continuation of the walkway, heading upstream

This small park is the continuation of the walkway, heading upstream

 

Looking downstream, back toward the main street of New Plymouth. The two trees on the left are marked historic by the Council and must be preserved.

Looking downstream, back toward the main street of New Plymouth. The two trees on the left are marked historic by the Council and must be preserved.

 

This small area above the banks of the previous photo could be a site for a work or perhaps one of the stop points on the walking symposium

This small area above the banks of the previous photo could be a site for a work or perhaps one of the stop points on the walking symposium

 

This photo is taken from a small bridge - too small for art works, but there is a car park next to it. The banks are quite steep though. This car park has a market on the weekends

This photo is taken from a small bridge – too small for art works, but there is a car park next to it (next photo). The banks are quite steep though. This car park has a market on the weekends

 

The car park on the left bank looking down stream. There is a car park on the right as well

The car park on the left bank looking down stream. There is a car park on the right as well

 

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huatoki-walkway1

Huatoki River walkway – SCANZ 2015:water*peace art work sites

This next set of photos connects from the landing outside Puke Ariki, across the road to the Huatoki Plaza.

On the bridge looking up stream, with the 30-60cm drop creating rapids.

On the bridge looking up stream, with the 30-60cm drop creating rapids.

 

Looking into the Plaza, beyond the pedestrian walk bridge

Looking into the Plaza, beyond the pedestrian walk bridge

 

The lower part of the Plaza forms a natural amphitheater. At this point the Huatoki disappears under one and a half blocks of buildings

The lower part of the Plaza forms a natural amphitheater. At this point the Huatoki disappears under one and a half blocks of building

 

To the left of the amphitheater, showing some of the building murals by local artists

To the left of the amphitheater, showing some of the building murals by local artists

 

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Gordon Bronitsky

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