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DonPatricio

Being Light

Don Patricio

Shaman Don Patricio in the ‘Car Garden’, Albuquerque.

Being Light: a festival of light and ideas explores ideas about light across  Maori, Navajo, Mayan, Pueblo and Western European culture. The festival has two parts, activities in the day with stalls and market; while in the night there are outdoor projections on the side of buildings. Attendance is free.

We live in a time where there is great interest in bringing together indigenous and Western cultures, art, science and technology. Currently involved are: Patricio Dominguez, Ian Clothier, Mike Andrews, Mike Sutherland, Issa Malluf, Agnes Chavez, Tom Greenbaum, Jamila Colozzi, Courtni Hale, Glenn Parry, Enrique Hynes, Julia Pyatt, Sandra Wasko-Flood and Susan Caffrey.

Te Huirangi Waikerepuru, Te Urutahi Waikerepuru (of Aotearoa New Zealand), Will Wilson and Richard Lowenstein have expressed interest. We are in contact with Santa Clara Pueblo and have invited Mayan participation.

At night, artworks are projected onto the exterior of buildings. The projections consist of a programmed selection of:

• projection works by leading artists
• visualization of energy data from humans
• audio works and music themed on light
• sculptures that use light are installed outdoors at night

During the day, the festival includes

• the creation of an energy labyrinth as a participatory art work in both construction and then walking the labyrinth. Activities include instructions on how to turn your phone into an electromagnetic field reader
• videos where shamans and senior representatives of cultural groups are paired with video students, to make short videos that reflect beliefs about light
• solar powered art works
• visualizations and sonifications of light energy
• activities and market stalls themed on light and sun in the day time
• sunflower painting for children; knowledge sharing of indigenous knowledge about growing sunflowers
• stories of the sun and the power of the sun
• solar powered objects and artefacts
• scientific stalls that express the Western science view of light – wave particle duality
• information stands expressing cultural viewpoints on light
• music themed on light

Exhibitions + Projects

Iwasaki, Hideo cultures cyanobacteria which then photosynthesise according to the light of the moving image work projected from below (from the 3rd nature exhibition)

Iwasaki, Hideo cultures cyanobacteria which then photosynthesise according to the light of the moving image work projected from below (from the 3rd nature exhibition

Intercreate.org projects and exhibitions

This page has introductory information about Intercreate.org projects, which include our biennial project SCANZ, exhibitions in Albuquerque, Istanbul, Rio and in Aotearoa New Zealand.

 


 

Upcoming

We are currently working on exhibition projects for Sydney, Albuquerque and Taos and Nga Motu New Plymouth. SCANZ 2015 will be themed Wai (water) and Peace, two significant issues facing humanity.

 


 

SCANZ 2013: 3rd nature exhibition

'The electromagnetic sensory world of sharks' by Mike Paulin, a Zoologist was projected onto the mesh of a 'sail', in the galleries which houses traditonal Maori artefacts.

‘The electromagnetic sensory world of sharks’ by Mike Paulin, a Zoologist was projected onto the mesh of a ‘sail’, in the galleries which houses traditonal Maori artefacts.

3rd nature at Puke Ariki integrated museum and library. To see works in the 3rd natureshow, click the image above.

 


 

Wai (for ISEA 2012 Albuquerque)

Te Urutahi Waikerepuru, Dine'/Navajo musician Andrew Thomas and his partner, Te Huirangi Waikerepuru, myself, Johnson Dennison, Gordon Bronitsky and Rosemary Dennison just before the ceremonies started.

Te Urutahi Waikerepuru, Dine’/Navajo musician Andrew Thomas and his partner, Te Huirangi Waikerepuru, myself, Johnson Dennison, Gordon Bronitsky and Rosemary Dennison just before the ceremonies started.

 

Water is essential for life, sacred to many indigenous peoples worldwide and endemic to natural processes. This project connects Maori cosmology, notions of integrated systems, Western art and science in order to reinvigorate our understanding of flow and water. The project reiterates the urgent need to engage with sustainable practices given climate change. It also underlines the importance of listening to the indigenous voice on the environment.

The Wai (Maori for water or flow) project uses technology to connect distant spaces and cultures around the theme of water. Water holds significance for Maori of New Zealand Aotearoa, Navajo/Dine in New Mexico and neighboring regions, and is essential to survival. Isleta Pueblo, Navajo/Dine and Maori ceremonies will be performed as part of the dawn opening for the exhibition.

The project is led by Te Huirangi Waikerepuru and curated by Ian Clothier. It will open September 19th at 516 Arts in Albuquerque. A collective of people spanning four countries and many cultures – Aotearoa New Zealand, USA, Australia, India and representatives of indigenous peoples -are presenting an interconnected project. The collective is known as Te Hunga Wai Tapu (the people for whom water is sacred).

For more information about Wai, check Wai exhibition and Wai participants.

 


 

Te Kore Rongo Hungaora Uncontainable Second Nature

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Te Kore Rongo Hungaora Uncontainable Second Nature was a project of ISEA 2011 Istanbul. A travelling version has since been formed, for exhibition in Rio de Janeiro.

The exhibition crosses cultural and discipline boundaries. The location of five themes from within European and Maori world views, provides a framework with which to construct a cultural bridge between Maori and European of New Zealand. Culture is usually presented separated and distinct; given the intercultural bridge, works from art and science are recontextualised as cultural texts symbolic of belief systems. Discipline is not fixed, but fluid in a transformational environment. In the exhibition, digital and post-digital exist in a state of hybridity.

Curated by Ian Clothier with an advisory panel of Nina Czegledy, Trudy Lane and Tengaruru Wineera, for ISEA 2011 Istanbul. Supported by:

Exhibited works

Please see here for a list of all the projects involved in the exhibition »

 

Exhibition Venues

Event: ISEA 2011 UNCONTAINABLE
Venue: Cumhuriyet Art Gallery, Istanbul, Turkey
Dates: September 14th – October 12th, 2011
Exhibition Page: Uncontainable: Second Nature
Related Event: Eco sapiens Round Table

Event: CulturaDigital.Br International Festival
Venue: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Dates: December 2nd–4th, 2011
Exhibition Page: Rongo Hungaora: Second Nature [Travelling]

 

 


 

 

inter / place

inter / place

 

 

The works in the exhibition inter/place present an attempt to come to grips in some way with the notion of multiplicity and a sense of distributed identity. Rather than gather all the artworks up in one area and present them as a selection of works on one theme, the artists taking part in this exhibition have been free to create their own work and explore different exhibition locations for that work. Subsequently none of these works have been placed in the conventional sites for exhibitions in Puke Ariki museum. There is no claim to novelty in this approach but rather the determination that a view based on distributed and multiple identity has been hybridised to the Puke Ariki location.

 

Venue

Puke Ariki – three works in the museum section and one in the library.
Date: December 2 2010 – February 3 2011.
A link to the catalogue is provided below.

InterPlaceWebPdf

 


 

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Uncontainable-second-nature

Uncontainable-second-nature (Te Kore-Rongo-Hungaora)is curated by Ian Clothier with an advisory panel of Nina Czegledy, Trudy Lane and Tengaruru Wineera, for ISEA 2011 Istanbul. The exhibition crosses cultural and discipline boundaries.  A cultural bridge has been constructed, providing a framework of both Maori and European knowledge. Five themes from within European and Maori world views were located.

Given the intercultural bridge, works from art and science are recontextualised as cultural texts symbolic of belief systems. Discipline is not fixed, but fluid in a transformational environment. In the exhibition, digital and post-digital exist in a state of hybridity.

Included are works by Julian Oliver, recipient of the Golden Nica at Prix Ars Electronica in 2011, Lisa Reihana, Julian Priest, Sonja van Kerkhoff, Sophie Jerram and Dugal McKinnon, Rachel Rakena, Jo Tito, Associate Professor Mike Paulin (Zoology), Paul Moss and Te Huirangi Waikerepuru.

The show opened at Dawn on September 14th at Cumhuriyet Art Gallery Taksim Square Istanbul and ran to October 12th as part of ISEA 2011 Istanbul.

Below are a few photos of some of the works, to remind people of the show. These are just some quick point and shoot images, further formal documentation will be added later.

 


Te Huirangi Waikerepuru stands before his chart of Te Taiao Maori – the backbone of the project


The psworld computer by Julian Oliver


Jo Tito’s kohatu (stone) Mauri Wai Mauri Ora between speakers playing breathing audio by Sophie Jerram and Dugal McKinnon


An image from Whanaunga by Lisa Reihana


Paul Moss’s Photo Astronomy images were embedded into star shapes, and the stars placed on the floor in the formation of the Southern Cross


Looking through to the second space, with part of Julian Priest’s Information comes from the sun on the cylindrical plinth and the exterior of Kāinga a roto Home within by Sonja van Kerkhoff, Sen McGlinn and Toroa Pohatu in the background.


Mike Paulin’s Computational Visualization of the Electromagnetic Sensory World of Sharks.


Julian Priest’s Information comes from the sun


One man is an island by Rachel Rakena


Looking from beside Kāinga a roto Home within toward works by Julian Priest (right) Mike Paulin and Rachel Rakena

Curatorial statement for Te Kore Rongo Hungaora – Second Nature

 

Curated by Ian Clothier with an advisory panel of Nina Czegledy, Tengaruru Wineera and Trudy Lane, a bridge between Maori and European cultures of Aotearoa New Zealand has been constructed. The cultural bridge interconnects both Maori and European knowledge at the level of summary. Five themes from within European and Maori world views were located.

Given the intercultural bridge, works from art and science are recontextualised as cultural texts symbolic of belief systems. Discipline is not viewed as fixed, but fluid in a transformational environment. In the exhibition, digital and post-digital exist in a state of hybridity.

The project began with the selection of concepts shared across ideological borders. The topics were loosely connected and include cosmological context, all is energy, life emerged from water, anthropic principle and integrated systems. All the selected works address more than one of these thematic regions.

Discipline boundaries were breached, following a course charted at SCANZ 2011: Eco sapiens where artists, scientists, environmentalists, activists, educationalists, philosophers and tangata whenua came together to collectively re-imagine our narratives on nature. In this way the event sought to encourage cultural shifts in response to the environmental crisis facing earth and humanity.

Breaching boundaries of culture and discipline, generating cultural hybridity and interdisciplinarity has consequences. There are gains and losses in the approach, but what might be won is a way forward that is sustainable, affirmative and interconnected. One sense of the term ‘culture’ refers to customary practice or a way of thinking, while one sense of ‘discipline’ is method – in these senses of those words, the works here arise from a culture of sharing and a discipline of openness.

 

Curator – Ian Clothier CV and bio

Ian Clothier is Director of Intercreate Research Centre (intercreate.org) and Founder and Co-director of SCANZ residency, symposium and exhibition. As an artist his projects intersect art, technology, science and culture. Recent creative projects include the integrated systems The Park Speaks and Haiku robots; and the hybrid cultural Making History a project of his internet micronation The District of Leistavia. He has had thirteen solo shows and been selected for exhibition at institutions in twelve countries including three ISEA exhibitions: ISEA 2009 Belfast exhibition; Taranaki culture at Puke Ariki, New Zealand; ISEA 2008 Singapore symposium; net.NET at The JavaMuseum; for Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival in the USA (upstate New York); ISEA 2006 San Jose exhibition; Graphite at the University of Otago NZ; the First International Festival of Electronic Art in Rio de Janeiro; Fair Assembly at ZKM; New Forms Festival in Vancouver; ISEA 2004 Tallinn/Helsinki exhibition; ReJoyce in Dublin and Wild 2002 in the Tasmanian Museum.  He was awarded a Converge Artist Fellowship at the University of Canterbury in 2005 for an augmented reality project. Written work has been published in respected journals, Leonardo, Convergence and Digital Creativity and he has delivered papers to conferences and symposia worldwide.

Curatorial experience includes being selection panel member for Solar Circuit Aotearoa New Zealand 2006; SCANZ 2009: Raranga Tangata; SCANZ 2011: Eco sapiens; Inter:place at Puke Ariki 2010; WITT-wide an exhibition covering work by staff of all departments of Taranaki’s polytechnic in 2009; Interactive City selection panel for ISEA 2006; Exhibitions, Policy and Education Officer, The Gallery Akaroa 1990 – 1992; Co-director of Summer Entertainment in Akaroa 1986; and Exhibition Officer 1984-86 at the Gallery Akaroa.

As well as curatorial panel membership he also produced and creatively directed the SCANZ events with Trudy Lane. Previously he had been Special Projects Manager at the University of Auckland Business School (managing world class teaching technology installations 1997-2002), and Survey Manager for Halcrow Fox Associates in the UK 1988-1990). In 2002 he was awarded and MA (Hons) from AUT, and has a Diploma of Art in Visual Arts from Monash University Gippsland Campus.

Research Publications

Clothier, I (2009). The Collaborative Landscape: some insights into current practice in the visual arts ITPQ refereed conference proceedings.

Clothier, I (2008). Leonardo, nonlinearity and integrated systems in Leonardo Volume 41 Number 1 pp. 49-55.

Clothier, I. & Lane, T. (2008). Solar Circuit Aotearoa New Zealand in S. Brennan & S. Ballard (Eds.) The Aotearoa Digital Arts Reader. Auckland: Clouds.

Clothier, I. & Lane, T. (2008). SCANZ. New Plymouth: Intercreate Press. ISBN 978-0-473-13388-7.

Clothier, I. (2007). Formen der Reprasentation: Hybride Kulturen, Nonlinearitat und creative Verfahren (Forms of Representation: Hybrid Culture, Nonlinearity and Creative Practice). In Kroncke, M; Mey, K & Spielmann, Y. (Eds.) Kultureller Umbau: Räume, Identitäten, Re/Präsentationen (Cultural Reconstruction: Spaces, Identities, Re/Presentations). Bielefeld: Transcript. ISBN 978-3-89942-556-7.

Clothier, I (2007). Created identities: hybrid cultures and the internet (revised with images) at http://www.hz-journal.org/n11/clothier.html

Clothier, I. (2007). Art.data/branching. New Plymouth: Intercreate Press. ISBN 978-0-473-11915-7.

Clothier, I. (2005). Created identities: hybrid cultures and the internet in Convergence  Volume 11 Number 4 p 44-59; London, Thousand Oaks and New Delhi:Sage Publications

Clothier, I. (2003). Hybrid cultures: what, where and how about us? Nga Waka, Aotearoa NZ Association of Art Educators Conference published in Nga Waka, ANZAAE refereed conference proceedings, Vol. One (1),2003

Clothier, I. (2001). From chaos and cosmology: a new space for the visual arts in Digital Creativity Volume 12 no. 1, p 31-44.

Mauri Wai Mauri Ora – Jo Tito

Mauri Wai Mauri Ora, 2011, Jo Tito (Iwi – Tribes: Taranaki, Ngāti Pikiao, Tūhourangi-Ngāti Wāhiao), Taranaki stone & acrylic paint

Jo Tito Is a Māori artist, passionate about sharing the importance of connection and helping people reconnect to who they are.

A self-taught photographer, she is also a multi-media artist who combines storytelling, nature and technology to share her messages. Working at the grass roots level of community through health and education initiatives, has enabled her to use art as a tool for change and to see the positive affects that connection and storytelling can have on a community.

The work for ISEA presents a “mauri” stone and explores a Māori concept of “energy” or “mauri” bringing the physical stone as an art work into the space. The stone carries the energy of the land from which it comes, and the many stories and energies that have been gathered prior to it’s journey to ISEA. The stone also incorporates all the works that are presented in this exhibition.

The rock has been formed by water and shares stories of connection to who we are; wai being the Māori word for water and also used when one asks,  “ko wai au – who am I?” With the understanding of water as being part of who we are, we can perhaps better understand our connection to the environment and the importance of water as an essential element to the survival of our planet and people.

 

Jo Tito CV and bio

Jo Is a 37 year old creative entrepreneur and artist who is passionate about art and bringing about change in the world. An innate connection to the land and environment inspires her creativity and the stories she tells through her work. She has been a photographer for the past 16 years and is also a multi-media artist working in painting, sculpture and digital storytelling. She also has a background in health and education and has worked at the grass roots level of community using art as a tool for change.

Connections and relationships are important to her and are at the heart of everything she does. Over the past 10 years, she has have had the privilege of working with some of the most talented artists from around the world through overseas travel, exhibitions, festivals and gatherings.

 

RECENT EXHIBITIONS

2011 Floating Land and Dreaming Festival – Artist in residence with international artists – Brisbane, Australia

Documentary of stories for Puke Ariki Museum exhibition – What If?, Taranaki

He Iwi Karioi exhibition currently showing at Tairawhiti museum – moving image installation, Gisborne

SCANZ 2011: Eco sapiens art residency, Taranaki

2010 Nga Manukura Maori midwives photographic project – photography and creation of digital stories for Auckland District Health Board

Co-director, Photographer & Editor for A Fire Burning a feature documentary by Flair Films

2009 Director of documentary – Iwirakau at the Tairawhiti Museum, Gisborne

Dreaming Festival, Brisbane Australia – indigenous artists research

2008 Aotearoa delegation to the 10th International Festival of Pacific Arts, Pagopago- America Samoa for digital storytelling & photography

Creation of digital stories for Nga Rama e Whitu exhibition, Gisborne

Travel to the Dreaming festival, Brisbane Australia – indigenous artists research

Sponsored trip to Indonesia by EngageMedia Australia for a gathering of software developers and video activists conference

2007 Author, researcher and editor of Matarakau – healing stories of Taranaki

Solo exhibition at the Thinkspace Gallery in Downtown Phoenix, Arizona USA

Digital storytelling workshop at Scotsdale Community College Arizona USA

Invited artist to the Gisborne Garden Artfest 2007, Gisborne

2006 Curator, storyteller & photographer of Wahine exhibition a b & w photographic exhibition by eight Maori women living in Taranaki at Nga Manu Korero – Opunake, Taranaki; Patea, Taranaki; and Hauiti marae Tolaga Bay, East Coast

Parihaka International Peace festival – exhibitor

Invited artist to the Gisborne Garden Artfest 2006

Ono Pacific Arts festival – invited artist for an exhibition of paper works with Sheynne Tuffery, Christchurch art section

Sept Selected artist for Rotorua artists exhibition at the Rotorua Museum

July Nga Manukura exhibition, Rotorua – exhibitor

July “He Puna Korero” Taranaki arts festival – emerging Maori artists exhibition