Gather

Gather – Kate Genevieve and David Montgomery

Project Proposal

This work will emerge out of a conversation between interested members of the Maori community and artists, Kate Genevieve and David Montgomery, and consider how members of this community situate themselves in the second decade of the 21st Century.  Kate will bring to this conversation her research into experiments devised within contemporary neuroscience to explore the neural bases of time perception.  The resultant installation will explore Maori notions through technology associated with contemporary neuroscience’s explorations.

Gather – proposal image

Through Gather they intend to explore marginalised traditional ways of experiencing time as opposed to the West’s clock time, using the engaged bodily experience of participants.   The immersive environment seeks to manipulate participant’s experience of subjective time by using animated visuals and soundscapes that respond to the audience’s real-time heart beat in the space.  Through combining bio-sensor technology with multi-sensory and haptic exploration of the botanical gardens, the intention is to destablise the body’s normal experience of time and its sense of being separate from the environment.

The film footage will incorporate patterns from the plant life of the site and, drawing upon David Montgomery’s expertise as an experimental film maker working with natural specimens, create experimental animation from the Park’s vegetation.  The visuals will incorporate leaves and plants from the Botanical Gardens, and draw on local knowledge of the gardens and the different plant species from across the globe that thrive together.

 

Background

As Artist in Residence at the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science at the University of Sussex, UK, Kate Genevieve has been collaborating with scientists investigating consciousness and the subjective feelings of presence and embodiment, and researching the methodologies and technologies science is using to approach subjectivity.  Her work within the centre has used immersive visuals as a means of investigating presence through the bodily experience of participants, often incorporating particular experiments into narrative performances.  An example of this is the interactive performance, NO PLACE, a walking meditation on presence within constructed environments that extended and pushed at the techniques of the “rubber-hand illusion”.

Recently Kate has been working with pulse-sensor technology to respond to the Centre’s work on how increased interoceptive awareness correlates with heightened feelings of presence.  This work led her into a particular interest in considering how bodily experience effects temporal experience.  With reference to experiments probing the neural correlates of time perception, as found in the research of neuroscientists Patrick Haggard and David Eagleman, Kate is now beginning to explore heart-beat responsive immersive environments to explore how heart beat feedback effects time perception.

The Gardens interestingly represent one instance of the blending of indigenous New Zealand culture and British culture, both in its history and its botanical life.  Gather seeks to respond to this site through incorporating the plant life of the Botanical Gardens into the visual experience.  Experimental film maker David Montgomery developed an animation technique using found objects, such as flowers, leaves, shells, and seed pods, while studying Digital Arts and Sciences at the University of Florida.  As Artist in Residence at the Exploratorium he created animated loops from the flowers of the Pohutukawa tree and conducted initial research which he will develop through Gather into the links between particular flowers and trees and Maori folktales.

 

Aims

Whilst contemporary western brain science and philosophy is key to Gather, the aim of this art practice is to widen out neuroscience research from its focus on standard western experiences of time and subjectivity.  Their attempt is to take neuroscience research into the world, into places not represented within science studies: outposts, islands, places and communities distant from the lab and the FMRI machine.   We hope that this effort towards cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary dialogue might suggest directions for returning science, as Merleau-Ponty puts it, “to the site, the soil of the sensible and opened world such as it is in our life and for our body…”[Eye and Mind].

Gather will be installed within the Pukekura Park Bandstand, a constructed and symbolic site that represents the spread of a Victorian mode of formalising and containing nature and experience. Installing Gather within the bandstand, that curiously British ornamental construction scattered round the globe in the Victorian era, involves a serious attempt to broaden and perhaps undo a production focussed, urban, industrial understanding of time and space that the bandstand signifies.

Exhausted by identity politics that lead to fixed binaries – western/non-western, art/science, male/female, technology/nature – their working processes seek out common ground.  This work is born from and results in communication and collaboration and will use digital technologies to create multi-sensory experiences that facilitate and suggest alternative (rather than new) ways of being in spaces.  The exact set up of the performance must emerge out of specific meetings, conversations and exchanges between groups of people and sites during the residency.

Brickets – Pierre Proske and Damian Stewart

Project Proposal

The outcome of this project is to sonify environmental data through a series of small solar powered audio-visual devices. Each device will be roughly the shape and size of a brick, hence their name – Brickets.

The devices collectively create an ecology of cricket-like sounds in a outdoor setting. Each Bricket  contains an electronic circuit that produces digitally generated chirps that resemble the sounds made by crickets or frogs. Each device also contains a series of LED lights that glow every time the device produces a chirp.

The devices are also capable of listening to their environment, communicating among themselves and receiving information every time another device chirps. The regularity of the chirping depends on the time of day (they become active at dusk) and the responses of the neighbouring Brickets. Different devices will tend to couple more strongly with their neighbours, producing pockets of synchrony as the population of Brickets moves between chaos and a common period of calling.

When a Bricket generates a sound, a ring of LEDs light up in sequence on the device’s face, visualising the duration of the playback of the chirp. While active, the Brickets have an interactive component as passing pedestrians will be able to influence the rhythm of the chirping by standing over the bricks or waving a limb over them. Brickets charge up their batteries using their in-built solar panel during the daylight hours, and then expend the energy as sound and light during the night.

One presentation opportunity for the Brickets would be to connect them to the daily water consumption of a building or area. Recent improvements in water and power data collection and measurement could enable this.  Just as frogs call after prolonged rain, so too would the Brickets sing if the building’s water use fell below a daily threshold. The devices would begin to call after dusk, and would serve as positive reinforcement to encourage thrifty water usage.

Brickets – proposal image

3rd nature: Hideo Iwasaki

iwasaki hideo

Introdcution

Professor Hideo Iwasaki runs the Laboratory for Molecular Cell Network & Biomedia Art at the Department of Electric Engineering and Bioscience of Waseda University in Japan.

In the images on this page it is possible to discern the intersection of art and science quite clearly. There is a blending which is a combination of aesthetics and scientific method.

This is quite different from the oft stated assumption that science and art are at loggerheads – that one (science) seeks to close knowledge by final solutions whereas the other (art) is open in terms of potential understandings.

The closure of scientific solutions often rests at a certain level of investigation. Thus when the structure of DNA was finally settled upon by Watson and Crick (based on the work of collaborative predecessors),  there was closure at a specific level of  investigation but of course the doors that have opened are far reaching and not able to be anticipated fully.

If the level of understanding of the Watson-Crick model is broadened then the dynamic role of DNA in the wider world becomes apparent, singularities in solutions dissolve and the integrated nature of biological systems becomes apparent.

What I mean by this is that in the laboratory, DNA is a molecule whose structure is examined and tested. It is only when stepping back, and examining experimentation from an ethical perspective that questions arise. What is the allowable extent of DNA manipulation? If an athlete was bred for physical supremacy should that athlete be allowed to compete against mere natural biological specimens?

It is how the DNA plays out at the 1:1 scale of reality that becomes the important factor. These aspects are open ended rather than closed. If science can prompt such questions, then structurally the same process is active as when art prompts similar questions.

Increasing the depth of understanding about a subject belongs to neither to the arts nor the sciences and can be the domain of both.

In the end it is not how art and science are different, but the fact they have both differences and similarities that matters. The boundary is one that can be dissolved and then be reformed dynamically.

As well as his cyanobacteria forms in the shape of proto-humans, we have asked Professor Iwasaki to also exhibit a paper cutout, which are expressions of complex natural forms made with scissors and paper. These works also follow a line intersecting science and art decisively. Below is shown a detail of Boundary Garden. For more information see  http://www.f.waseda.jp/hideo-iwasaki

Hideo Iwasaki

 

 

 

 

SCANZ 2013: 3rd nature – hui and symposium

SCANZ 2013 logoArts Council logoGeon logoian clothier logoMatahiapo logo

Feb 1st–3rd, 2013

Call for abstracts, due September 7th

 

We know we have built a civilisation which is unsustainable. How are we developing today the new culture that will allow us to create a sustainable civilisation?
— Roger Malina, Astrophysicist and Editor of Leonardo

Integrating indigenous perspectives with creative, environmental, scientific and academic views on reality is essential to a sustainable future. At the same time, computing and digital media are changing our relationship to culture and the environment.

On the one hand digital technology allows us to analyse and display data in new ways, as when anthropologists use language databases to shed light on the movement of culture.

On the other hand digital technology adds to our senses, and extends them beyond the body to the forests and the land. Scientists, artists and others are transforming the environment into an organism, as Maori and indigenous peoples have always known it to be.

SCANZ 2013: 3rd nature will bring together diverse people to discuss and celebrate how to approach working together across culture, discipline and media. We must work together to resolve the issues emerging at the boundary between fresh knowledge and deep knowledge, beginning with sharing knowledge and projects.

Presentations and projects which highlight cross cultural interchange and/or computing and electronics projects and/or the hybrid arts are sought. The ensuing discussion and presentations will then be shared in a special edition of Leonardo Electronic Almanac, the online publication of Leonardo – the leading Massachusetts Institute of Technology journal. Abstracts are due September 7th 2012.

The SCANZ 2013 program includes co-located project presentations and a discussion from European artists/environmental activists living and working in Belgium, Austria, Germany, Spain and the Czech Republic.

 

 

Who should attend?

Tangata whenua, indigenous peoples, scientists, artists, environmentalists, academics, philosophers, educationalists, musicians, teachers, technologists, and those concerned about sustainability, the future of Earth and humanity. Tangata whenua –people of the land – are indigenous to Aotearoa New Zealand.

The first day of the hui will be held at Owae marae. Keynote speakers are Dr Te Huirangi Waikerepuru (Aotearoa New Zealand) and Intercreate International Research Fellow Nina Czegledy (Canada & Hungary). The second and third days are to be held in Te Piere o te Rangi on the Western Institute of Technology at Taranki campus.

 

Presentations

There are four types of presentations which will be reviewed by robust process: peer reviewed, panel presentation, solutions and individual.

Peer reviewed

Papers can be put forward for peer review and inclusion in a special edition of Leonardo Electronic Almanac. The process will be rigorous. A peer reviewed paper could be based on a presentation made as a panel, a solution or as an individual.

Panel presentations

An important aspect of the hui and symposium will be themed discussions lead by interdisciplinary teams. These presentations will be an hour long, with panellists giving a concise 6 minute presentation (each) on their work, and then leading a discussion. Panellists will define a series of questions and then develop a position on the questions as preparation for the discussion. Panel teams can be proposed, applicants can simply indicate they wish to be part of a panel, or they will be invited.

Solutions

Solutions are 20 minute presentations about a completed project that crossed one or more of  boundaries of the following: art/science (or any other Western discipline)/computing and/or indigenous awareness. This may involve reporting on projects or activity that involved a negotiation of cultural borders, with an attempt made to preserve some values from both cultures;  or a computing project that put fresh light on culture, nature, the environment, science and/or art.

Individual

These are fifteen minutes duration, with a presentation of 10 minutes followed by 5 minutes of discussion. These presentations are drawn from disciplines across the spectrum. What are the health, environmental, psychological, culinary, audio, scientific, historical, engineering, business, construction, farming and/or creative implications of engaging across cultural borders or with electronic media? Presentations in this category can be from the perspective of a single discipline, but must involve engaging across cultural borders or involve electronic media. Individual refers to discussing one project, or by one presenter.

Workshops

If you are submitting a workshop, please include the word ‘Workshop’ as the first word in the title field. A workshop involving drumming would be titled ‘Workshop: Drumming’ for example.

 

Submission process

Abstracts will be submitted using Easy Chair, a conference management system. Instructions for using this system are the following:

  1. Go to: http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=scanz2013
    This is the Easy Chair SCANZ 2013 log in page.
  2. Get an Easy Chair log in. You will need a working email address that you can use at the same time, as confirmation emails will  be sent.
  3. Log in as an Author once you have your log in details.
  4. Then click the link at the top which says ‘New submission.
  5. Enter your submission. In the appropriate boxes, enter your name and contact details. Provide a title. Write an abstract (maximum 500 words, 350 preferred). Select the category you are applying under. Enter at least three keywords with each word separated by a line (the page does remind you to do this). You must enter at least three keywords. Check the ‘Abstract only‘ check box. Papers for those submitting them are submitted later.
  6. To edit your submission. You will be able to change your submission until the deadline of September 7th 2012. To change a submission, log in as an author. Click the link with the ‘Paper’ and a number. Click the ‘update information’ link on the right side of the page. Change details as required and then click the Change information button at the bottom of the form. You can also submit a new version, update authors and withdraw using the same page.

Due Date: Call for abstracts close September 7th

Note: If you are having trouble with the Easy Chair system, please contact us at ian.clothier@intercreate.org or trudy@intercreate.org.

 

SCANZ 2013: 3rd nature residency and Wānanga-Symposium

Artists at Parihaka

3rd nature residency artists and Parihaka hosts outside Te Raanui, the whare kai (house for eating). The visit to Parihaka set the residency off to an excellent beginning.

SCANZ 2013 artists at Owae Marae

This photo by Jo Tito shows the wananga- symposium attendees after the final session and clearing up. They are outside the whare kai Ko Tama Wahine at Owae Marae. The group had a wonderful spirit at this time.

SCANZ 2013: 3rd nature residency, wānanga-symposium, exhibitions and publication.

Themes

3rd nature involved creativity and innovation at the intersection of three critical interfaces:

*Acknowledging the environmental crisis; *Engaging with Maori and indigenous peoples; *Engaging with Sciences and the Hybrid Arts

These three intersecting dialogues provided space for a Third Nature, a fresh space for engaging with new knowledge and approaches vital to a sustainable civilisation.

Project Components

Residency; Wānanga-Symposium; Exhibitions – Museum, Botanic Garden; Publication

The SCANZ 2013 3rd nature residency is the basis for the entire project.

1. Residency

The residency commences with a visit to Parihaka on day one and two. Over the two week period of the residency, there will be a series of open labs in the WITT Art Space, where local people have been invited to take part in, and conduct sessions based on themed days. Interested people are welcome to attend and contribute.

The residency artists are:
Darko Fritz — darkofritz.net
Ilka Nelson — thelasttree.net
Sonja van Kerkhoff and Sen McGlinn — sonjavank.com/sensonja/index.html
Kate Genevieve and David C Montgomery — kategenevieve.com and silvefishcloset.com
Jo Tito — jotito-artist.com and handpaintedrocks.com
Pierre Proske and Damian Stewart — digitalstar.net, damianstewart.com
Jayce Salloum (screening) — tinyurl.com/jaycesalloum
Vicki Smith — sailingforsustainability.org
Dr Tracey M Benson — byte-time.com
Rulan Tangen — Dancing Earth
Nigel Helyer — Dr Sonique
Cecelia Cmielewski — Profile
Nina Czegledy — ninaczegledy.net
Trudy Lane and Halsey Burgund — thehouseofwonder.org, halseyburgund.com
Kura Puke — Profile
Brooke Sturtevant-Sealover — brookesturtevant-sealover.com
Deborah Lawler-Dormer — Academia.edu Profile
Josh Wodak — Project proposal
Terri Crawford — Profile
Guy van Belle — Profile
Shannon Novak — shannonnovak.com

Some of the project proposals accepted for the residency – see here»

2.Wānanga-Symposium

The list of accepted abstracts is found here. Below is the list and grouping of presenters.

Author
Presenter grouping and paper title
Mātauranga Māori, Science and Art
Dr Te Huirangi Waikerepuru Keynote 1
Alex Kmoch, Sheena Mannering-Tawera, Diane Bradshaw, Paul White and Hermann Klug A groundwater resources portal for New Zealand
Ian Clothier From second to third nature: building cultural bridges between Mātauranga Māori and Western science
Environment
Te Kipa Kepa Brian Morgan, Tumanako N. Fa’Aui and Robyn Desma Manuel Decision making at the Interface: Mauri and its contribution to the Rena Recovery
Margaret Smith & Fiona Clark Sustaining Waitara Waterways
Josh Wodak Comprehending Complexity: Art in the Anthropocene
Ricardo Dal Farra & Leah Barclay Balance-Unbalance: Arts + Science x Technology = Environment / Responsibility
Society and nature
Te Matahiapo Māori Society
Lesley Pitt A Pakeha social work view: liberation starts right here
Donna Willard-Moore An integral theory analysis of barriers to an ecologically sustainable civilization
Maja Kuzmanovich; Verena Kuni; Lorena Lozano; Reni Hofmuller; Annemie Maes; and Lenka Dolanova with Michal Kindernay Skype bridge – live presentations from Europe
Nina Czegledy Keynote – reFraming Nature
Nigel Helyer and Mary-Ann Lea Under the icecap
Cecelia Cmielewski Remote interventions
Mark Harvey, Dermott McMeel, Becca Wood, Mark Jackson, Maria O’Connor Body Imperfect
Indigenous cultures
Kura Puke and Stuart Foster The substance of experience
Gabriel Vanegas Logics of nature-driven technologies in a place Called America
Leah Barclay SONIC ECOLOGIES: Practice-led intersections of sound art, science and technology in global communities
Ana Terry & Don Hunter Un Litro de Agua
Deborah Lawler-Dormer He Poi, pattern, collaboration and electronic art installation
Melanie Cheung The Brilliant Brain Cell Show: Using Art for Neuroscience Education
Data, art and ecology
Vicki Sowry Echology: Making Sense of Data
Pinar Yoldas The very loud chamber orchestra of endangered species
Brian Degger Make, Do, Mend and Hack (MDMH) the biotechnologies of the 3rd Nature
Elise Smith and Anne Scott Technology meets Ecology – Where have all the little blue penguins gone?
Futures
Jock McQueenie The Art of Engagement
Christine Fenton, Tengaruru Wineera, Nina Czegledy, Mike Fenton Policy recommendations from the SCANZ residency session on working across boundaries of culture and discipline
Haritina Mogosanu Martian Diaspora – a discussion on what culture can mean to a spacefaring civilization

 

3. Exhibitions at Puke Ariki Integrated Museum and Library, Pukekura Park and Environs

The exhibition in Puke Ariki and Pukekura Park opened on February 2nd at dawn. Click the exhibition link above or this link for images of the works.

4. Publication

The exhibition and symposium will be presented in the form of a special edition of Leonardo Electronic Almanac with a limited edition print run. We are also in discussion with Cambridge Scholars Publishing for publishing proceedings.

Important dates and places

Wānanga-symposium dates: February 1-3 2013. Day one was at Owae Marae, day two at WITT, day three was at WITT and in Pukekura Park.

Residency dates: Friday 18 January to Monday 4 February 2013. Day one was at Parihaka, with the remainder at WITT. Several people arrived a day early so they could attend two days at Parihaka, which is world renowned as a site of peaceful resistance, under the leadership of Te Whiti and Tohu.

Exhibition opening: Dawn (6.28am) February 2 2013 at Puke Ariki. Pukekura Park projects were viewed on February 3rd. The exhibition closed on April 2nd 2013.

Thematic framework

Integrating indigenous perspectives with creative, environmental, scientific and academic views on reality is essential to a sustainable future. At the same time, computing and digital media are changing our relationship to culture and the environment.

On the one hand digital technology allows us to analyse and display data in new ways, as when anthropologists use language databases to shed light on the movement of culture.

On the other hand digital technology adds to our senses, and extends them beyond the body to the forests and the land. Scientists, artists and others are transforming the environment into an organism, as Maori and indigenous peoples have always known it to be.

SCANZ 2013: 3rd nature will bring together diverse people to discuss how to approach working together across culture, discipline and media. We must work together to resolve the issues emerging at the boundary between fresh knowledge and deep knowledge, beginning with sharing knowledge and projects.

Presentations and projects which highlight cross cultural interchange and/or computing and electronics projects and/or the hybrid arts were sought. The ensuing discussion and presentations will be shared in a special edition of Leonardo Electronic Almanac, the online publication of Leonardo – the leading Massachusetts Institute of Technology journal.

Background

The concept of a third space – a zone of hybridity – traverses the cultural landscape from the writing of Homi Bhabha in the mid 1990s, to Sony advertising (see hypertext.rmit.edu.au/dac/papers/mcguire.pdf). Hybridity is now embedded in creative and cultural production and consumption.

A space of hybridity can assimilate potentially any set of concepts. SCANZ 2013 3rd nature sought to develop a fresh space, carrying memes from previous SCANZ events (which have all had an emphasis on environment) and other Intercreate projects that have involved scientists, indigenous peoples and artists working together. We are aiming to build new knowledge and establish legacies around this work, unencumbered by old perspectives and now distant categories.

We ignore the environmental crisis at our peril. Integrating the indigenous perspective, creative, environmental and scientific views on the environment is essential for continued human habitation of the planet. From these trajectories, it is possible to conceive of a fresh hybrid space, composed of overlapping elements.

We asked tangata whenua, artists, technologists, teachers, environmentalists, scientists, philosophers, educationalists, indigenous peoples, technologists and lecturers to contact us with ideas for talks, discussions, presentations, residency projects, exhibition ideas for gallery space and a botanic garden.

SCANZ graphicArts Council logoGeon logoian clothier logo